Stoney St. Claire

Occult Vibrations Book Shelf: LOST LOVE

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Bob Collins

Things go in cycles.
Back in they glory days of the 1990s, before large publishing houses realized that there was money to be made by mass producing generic tattoo books, we had it good. The books that were available pretty much fell into three basic categories:

Independent Press.
Scholastic./Medical.
Art Books.

1579927_10203135474375783_1196755382_nWhile clearly for profit, these books were niche sellers, made for a specific demographic (though in the case of Scholastic or Medical texts, often a shared one) who generally had to seek them out. I spent almost every Saturday during those years driving to Ybor City to check out the new pickups at Cindy Wheeler’s Three Bird’s bookstore; a one-stop-shop for zines, cult authors and tattoo books. The majority of my Hardy Marks collection came from those visits; Rocks of Ages, Forever Yes, Pierced Hearts and True Love… the best of the tattoos books were put out by and for tattooed people.

Things changed. Things always change. Someone realized that books on tattoos- culled from stock photos with a hack-for-hire to churn out ‘expert’ text illustrating biomechanical, tribal or newschool tattoos for casual readers in middle America- were a guaranteed seller. You went from Permanent Curios to The TOTAL Tattoo Book! overnight.

For a while it was absolutely possible, with due diligence, to track down and purchase almost every commercially released tattoo book available, and what’s more,  most were good. Better than good really. Some transcended and became iconic. Then things went a little crazy, with books by authors or photographers you never heard of flooding retailer shelves, each more bland then the one before it. The soul was gone.

After the mass production/consumption phase, we were in a black hole. Hardy wasn’t releasing books with any regularity. The internet became a depository for a quick fix (after all- photos could be uploaded real time from conventions and shops the world over; no more waiting for the latest issue of Tattoo Revue or Hardy compilation to be released) and things got stale.

Lost Love preview.

Lost Love preview.

The cycle thankfully started to shift back in our favor a few years ago when tattooers began investigating the self publishing world, and thanks to online retail, were able to skip the middleman and find a global audience hungry for content. Dave Fox’s HAUNTED, Grime’s TWO YEAR AUTOPSY and a handful of others became instant classics and started a wave that we’re now fully enjoying.

For my money, the best and brightest in this new generation of tattoo publishing has to be Yellow Beak Press. Started by tattoo collectors Scott Boyer and Kayla Grosneth, YBP burst onto the scene with 2012’s mammoth undertaking ‘Tattooing as you like it: The Legacy of Milton Zeis.” The book was an instant success; Boyer and Grosneth not only researching the life and times of Milt but also gathering 95 of the world’s top tattooers to reinterpret classic Zeis designs.

They followed it up with my personal favorite Yellow Beak offering, 2013’s ‘Born Weird’, a companion book to the art show of the same name with 29 amazing tattooers contributing disturbing, vile, prurient tattoo flash for a no holes barred adult audience. It remains my most recommended tattoo book that was released in 2013 though I admit given it’s lower than lowbrow designs it has a hard time ingratiating itself to casual readers.

1477700_10202668090211471_567420024_nFor 2014 they’ve taken another look into the past with ‘Lost Love’,  collecting (some for the first time) classic tattoo flash by  icons like Cap Coleman, Sailor Jerry Collins, Stoney St. Clair, Percy Water,Owen Jensen, Bob Shaw,  Zeis Studios and more. The pages lovingly highlight the roots of European/American tattoo designs that we all but take for granted today; dice, cards, snakes, panthers, Girl heads, Skunks and Ducks, Hotstuffs and Horses… 260 pages packed with designs that are as “ancient as time, as modern as tomorrow.” Scott and Kayla present the flash sheets along with archival photos, newspaper clippings and ephemera that influenced what went on to be classic designs and very little in the way of text. These images speak for themselves and will undoubtable influence a whole new generation of artists.

With more and more publishing being done digitally and Kindle and iBook editions starting to take market share, it’s nice to see a small publishing house stick to tradition and release honest to goodness print books, particularly when it comes to tattoo culture. With their third book they’ve proven themselves to be committed to properly documenting the best of tattooing’s past, as well as the brightest of it’s future. 

You can purchase Lost Love directly from Yellow Beak Press.

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LOST LOVE: Coming 2014

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Do you folks remember that time that Yellow Beak Press put out two of the best tattoo books in recent memory?
2012 saw the release of the mammoth tome chronicling the life and times of Milton Zeis; tracing his roots, reprinting classic supply ads and featuring Zeis supply original flash sheets side by side with repaints by 95 of the world’s best tattooers while 2013 gave us Born Weird- a collection of truly trashy, offensive, subversive and downright hilarious 11×14 sheets supplied by a host of demented souls who should be sorry for what they unleashed onto the world.

Scott of Yellow Beak has announced 2014’s project: LOST LOVE, a 9×12 book featuring classic flash, stencils, sketches and photos from Cap Coleman, Paul Rogers, Sailor Jerry, Stoney St Clair, Duke Kaufman and many more.  Folow the book’s progress instagram @lostlovebook

Yellow Beak has set a high standard for tattoo publications, and I’m very excited to see what comes next!

Payin’ off like a slot machine!

I wonder if the world of tattooing will ever have genuine characters like Stoney St. Claire again?
Not a twentysomething with pomade in his hair who loves boxing with (insert exotic animal here) while waxing his mustache, but honest to god hillbilly carnies like Stoney.

Sadly, probably not.

That said, Stoney’s legacy left us with so many amazing stories and anecdotes- some of which can be seen in the film by Alan Govenar with even more in the classic Stoney Knows How book.

This painting came to me recently as a gift from my good friend Wayde Dunn; an Australian living in Canada. Like myself, Wayde can’t get enough of Stoney, and this painting is a little reminder of an accent paying off- something I’m sure Mr. Dunn can relate to.

Thanks, Wayde!

You is working for the devil

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I’ve found myself working on Christmas Eve, sitting and listening to Ratt (Hang the DJ comes to mind) enjoying Stoney St. Claire in the classic Alan Govenar film ‘Stoney knows how’.

I hadn’t watched it through in quite some time, and I forgot what a charming character Stoney was.
Since I don’t have anything queued up for tonight I’ll leave you with Stoney.
Happy Holidays!

“I LEONARD “STONEY” ST. CLAIR, AM IN THE BUSINESS OF RENDERING A SERVICE TO THIS COMMUNITY FOR THE SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO CHOOSE TO HAVE THEIR BODIES DECORATED IN SOME WAY OR ANOTHER…
I CHOOSE TO PURSUE MY PROFESSION WITH INTELLIGENCE AND SKILL, WISHING NOT TO OFFEN ANYONE, BUT INSTEAD WITH MY LOVE OF MANKIND, DO WHAT GOOD I CAN DO BEFORE I DIE.

EONARD L. “STONEY” ST. CLAIR
TATTOOIST OF THE OLD SCHOOL *** SINCE 1928.