Don Ed Hardy

CPISD- Ed Hardy, Hanky Panky and Randy Adams

Another ‘Colored People Invade San Diego’ installment.

This clip features:
Krystyne the Kolorful. Krystyne was an exotic dancer from Alberta, Canada who had approximately 95% coverage and was a famous ‘tattooed lady’ of the 1980s. No audio with her.

Ed Hardy. Ed gives a brief rundown of his history with tattooing; stuff that’s already been covered in other videos, but it’s always nice to hear Ed talk like a beatnik.

Henk ‘Hanky Panky’ Schiffmacher talking about the (late 1980s) state of European tattooing.
I still hold Henk’s Amsterdam Tattoo Convention (I went in 1995- have the video just don’t have an 8mm player to convert it!) as one of the most impressive conventions I’ve ever been to and his contribution to the tattoo world (with documenting and with his Amsterdam Tattoo Museum) has been legendary but not nearly as celebrated as it should be.

This tape is showing wear and the audio is slightly unsynched. I had a complete backup of it but the entire thing was off; so I’ve been slowly recapturing scenes (versus the entire movie) and redoing the audio. It’s taking a while, but at least the clips are preserved on the internet.

You is working for the devil

*

I’ve found myself working on Christmas Eve, sitting and listening to Ratt (Hang the DJ comes to mind) enjoying Stoney St. Claire in the classic Alan Govenar film ‘Stoney knows how’.

I hadn’t watched it through in quite some time, and I forgot what a charming character Stoney was.
Since I don’t have anything queued up for tonight I’ll leave you with Stoney.
Happy Holidays!

“I LEONARD “STONEY” ST. CLAIR, AM IN THE BUSINESS OF RENDERING A SERVICE TO THIS COMMUNITY FOR THE SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO CHOOSE TO HAVE THEIR BODIES DECORATED IN SOME WAY OR ANOTHER…
I CHOOSE TO PURSUE MY PROFESSION WITH INTELLIGENCE AND SKILL, WISHING NOT TO OFFEN ANYONE, BUT INSTEAD WITH MY LOVE OF MANKIND, DO WHAT GOOD I CAN DO BEFORE I DIE.

EONARD L. “STONEY” ST. CLAIR
TATTOOIST OF THE OLD SCHOOL *** SINCE 1928.

Greg Irons, Bill Salmon, Dan Thome

More from Tattooing Reality (thanks to my friends at Avail) with better quality.
In this excerpt, Ed Hardy talks about the roots of Realistic Tattoo; featuring Greg Irons, Bill Salmon and Dan Thome.

While Leo Zulueta had a major impact on the popularity of ‘tribal’ tattooing, Thome is an under looked figure in the evolution of graphic abstract and traditional Polynesian tattooing. His work laid the way for artists like Thomas Hooper, Jondix, ThomasThomas, Xed et all. So strange to think of him working by hand in a major shop in 1985.

Living the Dream

More Fred Corbin on VBS; episode two is now streaming.
FC2 at Vice.

The two Corbin episodes that have dropped have really played out like a loveletter to the culture of Tattooing; you can see in Fred’s eyes that he knows he’s one of the luckiest son’s a bitches in the world and that he’s thankful for everything tattooing has brought him. You can also see the respect his peers have for him in all of the interviews that accompany the piece.

It’s a bummer that we only have one Corbin episode left; the good news is the folks at Vice are finally calling this Season One….

The picture above is of Mr. Corbin and Daniel Higgs, showing their Ed Hardy back pieces. Fred is the Rock of Ages. So damned cool.

Daniel Higgs interviewed by Ed Hardy

Tattoo magazines were usually a mixed blessing, back in the pre-internet Dark Ages. On one hand they connected you to a global tattoo community; on the other they were usually put out as part of a Biker magazine family and didn’t always reflect the cultural standards of something like Hardy’s TATTOO TIME.

As tattoo culture evolved, more and more magazines popped up. Content was king; when you had a family of magazines to put out every month you’d pretty much feature anything and everything you’d photograph at a convention. Each passing issue would have less and less quality work, but you’d pick them up, just in case.

For my money, the best of the bunch was Michelle Delio’s run on Tattoo Revue. (which ran under the banner of Outlaw Biker’s Tattoo Revue) As the editor, she really turned things around, wooing top artists to provide content.

Issue #25 had a multipage interview with Daniel Higgs conducted by Ed Hardy. While Tattoo Time #5 featured some of Daniel’s work, this was a rare sitdown interview that puts you where his head was at the time. I scanned the entire interview last year and put it in my flickr page. Last night, someone submitted my scanned pages to Occult Vibrations for inclusion. Strangely enough, I had forgotten about them, so it was a welcome email.

Here’s the complete article:
Daniel Higgs being interviewed by Don Ed Hardy, Tattoo Revue #25:

*** *** *** ***

How did you get started in tattooing?

I started getting tattooed right after I got out of high school… I got one and just kept going back to get more and more, so I was in the shop all the time time, at Tattoos Tux’s place in Baltimore… and after doing that for a few years I landed an apprenticeship with him to work there for a couple of years, learning the rudiments of it, and eventually wound up out in San Francisco doing some tattooing and it just kind of fell together.

Were you doing other kinds of art before that?

Yeah, I’ve always drawn pictures…

(more…)

Tattoo Zeke part II

I started out getting small pieces and then moved on to larger multi-sitting tattoos. I got a lot of satisfaction out of the larger stuff; not just the big pieces themselves but the time spent getting them. As I get older (and more to the point, as I run out of space) getting smaller tattoos has been exponentially more fun…. the road trips to get them, meeting new tattooers and most importantly having them completed when I walk out of the shop.

Continuing with excerpts from ‘Tattoo Zeke’, this snippet finds both Zeke discussing why he prefers doing smaller, single sitting tattoos over larger body work. Ed Hardy weighs in as well.

Tattoo the World

Upon walking up to the entrance of the I-20 Gallery for the ‘Tattoo the World’ release party, three things struck me right off the bat:

Firstly, Ed Hardy was standing out front being photographed from every angle, remaining polite and cooperative regardless of how many people shoved a camera in his face. Even though I had met him before, he’s still Ed Hardy. Even in his mid 60’s he still exudes cool; like your art teacher in 8th grade who told you about Kurosawa films and was also a surfer cool.

Secondly, there was a gentleman who looked like Carlton from ‘The Fresh Prince of Bel Aire’ who had on red pants and a blue jacket that people were fawning over. I’m assuming he was either someone ‘known’ in the art/entertainment world or what happens when adults dress like Smurfs, but either way it was an indicator that I wasn’t really in a place where I was going to fit in.

Lastly, and like I touched on above… that I didn’t exactly fit in. Jotting notes in my notebook I looked up to see people staring at my arms. And hands. And throat. I checked to make sure I didn’t have a stain on my shirt or my zipper wasn’t down first; covering all of the bases to make sure it was something other than my tattoos that was making me stand out in the crowd…

The crowd at an Ed Hardy event.

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